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A doctor can bury his mistakes, but an architect can only advise his clients to plant vines.”

Frank Lloyd Wright

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  • +986-99-8885
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  • 16 Church Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11226

Fort Hays State University Scholarship Program

Read the original release here 

Base Camp Leasing’s President, Steve Meng is proud to announce the recipient of the 2017-2018 BCL Scholarship.

Congratulations to Hunter Hewitt, a Senior at Sterling High School.

The Base Camp Leasing Scholarship requires students to carry a minimum 3.0 GPA, major is Agricultural Business or Wildlife Management, and have a part-time job. Next year, Base Camp Leasing will award 2 scholarships next year and encourages all Fort Hays students who meet these criteria to apply! Congratulations to Hunter!

Nathan Mrnak To Join The Base Camp Leasing Team As Chief Operating Officer

For Immediate Release

October 27, 2017

Nathan Mrnak To Join The Base Camp

Leasing Team As Chief Operating Officer  

Base Camp Leasing Excited To Welcome Mrnak In January of 2018

FISHERS, Ind. ­­– Base Camp Leasing is proud to announce the hiring of Nathan Mrnak as their Chief Operating Officer (COO). Mrnak will begin his new position at the start of January 2018.

Base Camp Leasing has been dedicated to helping landowners lease their hunting rights since 1999 and is the largest hunting lease company in the country with roughly 2,600 leases. They dominate the DIY hunting space with their annual lease for all game species model. Base Camp currently operates in 22 states east of the Rocky Mountains. Base Camp will be able to continue expanding and providing many more hunting opportunities with the addition of Mrnak as COO.

“I could not be more excited to join Base Camp Leasing and this dedicated and knowledgeable team, where it was clear to me very early on that our values, vision and passion for the outdoors align,” said Mrnak. “I am looking forward to what the future holds for our customers, company and my family in this new opportunity.”

With 10 years of operations leadership in the outdoor industry, most of which has been with Cabela’s, both in retail and hunt bookings, Steve Meng, President of Base Camp Leasing, is confident of Mrnak’s skills to drive extensive and sustainable growth for the company.  Part of Mrnak’s duties as COO for Base Camp Leasing will be providing leadership, management and the vision necessary to ensure that the company has the proper operational controls, administrative and reporting procedures in place.

“Nate’s experience and leadership skills match up perfectly with our culture, and vision for the next generation of Base Camp Leasing,” said Meng. “It is truly humbling to be able to attract this caliber of talent.”

Mrnak says that his favorite time to hunt is with his two daughters who are nine and twelve-years-old and have harvested deer and turkey every season since they were eight. “It feels like a blessing to be able to create those kinds of opportunities on private land for other families.” expresses Nate.

For more information go to www.basecampleasing.com or call toll free at (866) 309-1507.

 

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Media Contact:

Connor Hermesch

Base Camp Leasing Marketing Associate

Connor@basecampleasing.com

(866) 309-1507

The Ties Between Preserving The Environment And Leasing Private Land

For Immediate Release
Oct. 27, 2017

The Ties Between Preserving The
Environment And Leasing Private Land

River Otters Making A Come Back In Indiana

FISHERS, Ind. – Landowners have recently found out that leasing the hunting rights for their land is a great way to earn some extra cash. But there are also other benefits of leasing the hunting rights, including stewardship.

You always see on the news of a big corporate company cutting down trees, polluting the water or any other way of destroying the environment so they can make an extra buck. So why be a part of that? Don’t sell or lease your land to the guys in a suit who only see your land as a trash dump. Lease it to hard working hunters who would rather take care of your piece of land the right way and allow the habitats to grow for not just their selves, but also for the environment.

Stewardship can allow increased benefits for the landowner, hunter, and the environment. The landowner will benefit because when the land is properly managed, there is a higher quality of game, therefore a higher price for the lease. And with a higher quality of game, the hunter will benefit from a better experience hunting. But one of the most important benefits is the preservation of the environment.

One species’ habitat that has been affected by improper land management is the river otter. Otter population dramatically decreased starting in the year of 1942. Indiana is one state that has been affected by this. According to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources’ Fish and Wildlife Service, otters were placed on the endangered species list in 1994 due to habitat loss, water pollution, and unregulated trapping. The DNR implemented a program that relocated 300 otters from Louisiana and introduced them to various rivers in northern and southern counties of Indiana.

Five years later the otter population started to expand on their own through the process of natural reproduction. Finally, in 2005 river otters were removed from the endangered species list. However, even though they have been removed from this list and it is legal to trap them in Indiana, they are still being watched closely so the dramatic decrease of this species does not happen again.

The preservation of land is one reason why Steve Meng, President, started Base Camp Leasing. “Knowing that the additional licenses that were purchased because of the hunting opportunities we open up helped fund this re-introduction is quite satisfying,” said Meng. “To see the effects first hand is just icing on the cake.”

Base Camp Leasing has been dedicated to helping landowners lease their hunting rights since 1999. They are proud to promote and be a part of the stewardship process that is implemented by their hunters and landowners. They currently operate in 22 states east of the Rocky Mountains. Go to www.basecampleasing.com for more information or call toll free at (866) 309-1507.

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Media Contact
Connor Hermesch
Base Camp Leasing Marketing Associate
Connor@basecampleasing.com
(866) 309-1507

7 Things I Learned From Warren Buffett That Can Be Applied To Farming

By Scott Anderson, CEO of Cash Cow Farmer. Listen to the entire podcast HERE

7 Things I Learned From Warren Buffett That Can Be Applied To Farming

I’ve been traveling a lot recently, but one trip has left a different mark on me from the others.

This year I attended the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting with my 11 year old son Drake, which means we heard six hours of Q & A with Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger. As a farmer, I was listening from a very interesting perspective, to see if I could transfer the wisdom I heard from Buffett, in particular, to a farming operation.

I got more than I bargained for.

There was a farmer that stood up and asked Buffett and Munger about farming.  Munger said it was a horrible business because farmers only make money once every twenty years.  It’s about five and a half hours into the yahoo finance live stream if you want to listen to it.  Needless to say the cards are stacked against us farmers…

Warren Buffett has actually owned farmland for most of his life. He purchased his first farm in Nebraska for around $10,000 before he entered high school with money earned from running a paper route.

Of course, Warren Buffett is 85; nowadays, that same land probably costs $800,000. Can you imagine buying a $800,000 piece of land before entering high school? That was Warren Buffett’s earning capacity as a young man.

So when he talks, I listen. I recommend that you do the same.

Here are seven things I learned from Buffett that can be applied to farming.

1) Read Ferociously

Buffett reads 5-7 hours a day: 4-5 newspapers, annual reports, books, and more.  The man just ferociously reads.

Honestly, the more I read the more my challenges and problems lessen or diminish. Reading is the number one thing that entrepreneurs can do to leverage themselves and become more competitive. Build a library; books are cheap.

But what about taking action, you say? If I sit and read all day, won’t that distract me from actually executing my business plans?

Sometimes the best strategy is to sit on your hands or in Buffett’s works “thumb sucking”.  Wait for an opportunity to come where all you have to do is walk over and pick up the money.

There’s definitely a balance between acquiring knowledge and applying it. Remember: knowledge is only powerful when it’s organized into an actionable format.

But here’s what I’ve found: you will always have problems popping up. Books will inspire solutions constantly; I listen to audiobooks all the time that spark solutions to problems that the book isn’t even addressing directly. But because I’m thinking through the totality of business as I read or listen along, my mind is primed to unfold new actionable strategies.

You want to be a billionaire? Read like the dickens.

2) Work With People You Like—And Who Love Their Jobs

If your partners and employees aren’t passionate, you shouldn’t work with them. Buffett’s advice was to look for people who would pay to do their job.

Think about Sam Walton: he drove an old pickup truck with Dog kennels in the back. And today, if he were still alive, he’d be worth almost $200 billion. He just loved what he did every single day and so did his employees.

If you find employees like that, you’re in an incredible place to succeed.

3) Have Fun Showing Your Passion

When you’re passionate about what you do and you have fun doing it, people are magnetized to you. People call you with deals— they want to work with you.

I try to have fun with all my suppliers, whether that’s a dinner every now and then, calling them up and giving them crap, or following them on social media. I try to get a really great relationship with the people I do business with.

And anytime a deal comes up, guess who’s always the first person they call?

4) Focus on Adding Earning Power

When you’re adding earning power, you’re reinvesting any profits into things that are going to grow your business. Only invest in something that shows a nice positive ROI.

For example, in 2012-13 when farmers had a lot of extra money, they bought a lot of machinery they didn’t actually need, wasting capital that didn’t provide extra earning power. They would have been better served to use their old machinery and wait for better investment opportunities.

They might not even be farm-related investments; we’ve had farmers in my area that have invested in restaurants and things like that for extra revenue. Which leads me to the next point.

5) Be Capital-Efficient 

This is Warren Buffett’s secret weapon. He only buys (or at least tries to only buy) capital-efficient businesses.

Think about it: if you start at $100 make 20% of that in a year, you’ll make $120. Then the next year you should be able to make 20% of $120, which is an added $24 for $144, and then 20% of that next year , and so on.

See how fast it compounds? That’s how Buffett became one of the richest guys in the world for most of his career. With the money his businesses make, he looks at buying other capital-efficient businesses, and it compounds and compounds.

6) Run Each Field Like Its Own Business, and Make Sure It’s Adding to the Pot

Buffett makes sure that each business he buys is adding to the pot.

Applying that principle to your farm, make sure you break your farming operation down into individual fields and know the production costs on each. Then you can say, “These fields are losing me money… Why?”

You’ll have two options: turn them around to produce profit, or get rid of them.

7) Keep a Lot of Cash (a.k.a. Dry Powder) Around “Be Greedy When Others Are Fearful and Fearful When Others Are Greedy”

That advice about being greedy comes from a pretty famous Warren Buffett statement. Anytime there’s a market crash, he’s lining up to buy all those companies he’s wanted to buy for years, because they are now on sale. The “thumb sucking” has finally paid off! Buffett will wait 10-20 years to buy a company, holding off until their stock plummets to an affordable price.

Baron Rothschild, an 18th century nobleman, said that “the time to buy is when there’s blood in the streets.” The worse the market, the better the opportunities.

Things are unfolding in agriculture that are making people with “dry powder” have decent opportunities to soup up their operations and grow their businesses.

Conclusion

I took plenty of notes at the Annual Meeting—way too much to fit here. But even if you follow just these seven steps, you’ll be utilizing solid business advice from a rock star in the financial world. Check out our farm management software to start stress testing your operation to make sure each field is making you money.

Not a bad idea, right?

To learn more, email us, follow me on Snapchat (CashCowFarmer), or watch the whole 2016 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting on Yahoo Finance.

 

May 2016

Featured Property #7054 – Hardeman County, TN

  • Acres212
  • Max Hunters: 3
  • Price: $3,605

Here’s your opportunity to hunt the #4 County in the State of Tennessee in harvest numbers on this really nice lease offering two separate parcels for your hunting pleasure. You will have thick, reclaimed woodland that’s really holding the deer with good bedding and browse. There is an old food plot you can bring back to life if you choose right in the middle of… read more

Contact us to learn more about this opportunity!

Joe Brooks – Regional Mgr
joe@basecampleasing.com

Proud Supporter of the NWTF
Any time you can shoot a bearded hen, it becomes an immediate trophy. It is especially significant when the bearded hen likely breaks the National Wild Turkey Federation’s record for North Carolina!

The lucky hunter, Josh Pruitt of Reidsville, had seen the hen before during the 2014 season and the summer of 2015, but had never had a shot until… read more

Story from Nathan Unger, wideopenspaces.com

Introducing BoneView

BoneView allows hunters to check trail cameras in the field using their smartphone!  BoneView can VIEW, SAVE, SHARE, and DELETE photos or videos from your trail camera SD cards.  With BoneView, hunters can instantly see which cameras are hot, what deer are in the area and make last second stand selections based on real-time trail camera data to improve their odds at success.


“I’ve been looking for this solution for a while. There may be others out there, but I picked this up when I got my new Elite bow last week. This product lets you check your trail cam pictures or videos on your iPhone….or Android. Works slick and I’m excited to not have to take my iPad to the stand.” – Steve Meng, President – BCL

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Base Camp Leasing, Inc.
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Our mailing address is:
10412 Allisonville Road, Suite 101
Fishers, IN  46038
(866) 309-1507
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April 2016

Featured Property #4435Marion County, AR

  • Acres870
  • Max Hunters: 14
  • Price: $12,000

WOW! Is the first word that comes to mind when I think of all the wildlife on this ranch. If you’re looking for Bucks, Birds… read more

Contact us to learn more about this opportunity!

Joe Brooks – Regional Mgr
joe@basecampleasing.com

A portion of every lease goes to supporting the NWTF’s Save The Habitat. Save The Hunt. initiative.
Way to go, Myles!

My first P&Y buck a beautiful IL 10pt. Shot this buck on the afternoon of Dec 31st and had to wait until the next morning to find him. He was worth the wait!Couldn”t think of a better way to start off 2016! A hunt my father and I will never forget. Thanks Base Camp for helping me connect with my first buck with a bow. Next season can”t come soon enough!

From OutdoorHub.com

Morel hunting is a passion of mine. Over the years, it has become a tradition for me and my boys to head out in the hopes of bringing home a feast. Morel hunting is… read more

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10412 Allisonville Road, Suite 101
Fishers, IN  46038
(866) 309-1507
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2016: A YEAR OF CHALLENGES OR OPPORTUNITY?

Get in shape for hunting

The 2015 agricultural year in the US was less than stellar.  Net Farm Incomes as reported by USDA were somewhere around $58 B – ½ of what they were two years ago!  Crop commodity prices remain much lower than in recent years and while some inputs costs are dropping (fuel and fertilizer are the primary two) they are not declining as fast as the income has.  As we enter 2016 the income picture remains less than rosy, unless a supply issue develops such as a drought or flood in a major production area.  Rents are generally lower for 2016, depending on where they were in 2015. Reductions of 5-15% are typical for 2016.

Farmland values started a downward trend in the Corn Belt in early 2014 and this trend continues. The most recent publication from the 7th district of the Federal Reserve Bank shows a decline of 3% from December of 2014 to December of 2015. The Purdue land value survey published back in August shows top quality Indiana farmland decreasing (-5.1%) from June 2014 to June 2015.  Halderman sales this winter reflect this trend downward as our results show weak marketplaces with a range of -5% to -15% depending on the area and farm.

The lending community is very cautious heading into this year. Most operators are solid financially, however we hear that some are struggling and therefore this could create more farms on the market for lease and for sale.

Since the 1980’s ag lenders are the best “governor” for the ag community and will continue to keep a conservative approach to their lending in these difficult times.

Here are some developing trends or issues to think about during 2016.

Lease Terms

A CHALLENGE

As farm incomes decline versus previous years the pressure on land rents continues.  This past fall negotiations for 2016 land rents were some of the most challenging in recent years as farm tenants and landowners struggle with determining the “right” rent for the farm.  Farm incomes in the same neighborhood may vary greatly depending on how producers market their grain, their fixed costs (equipment), actual production and if they have crop insurance protecting them.  Here at Halderman our 20 farm managers have their hand on the pulse of the rental market and are very capable at assisting you in the rental negotiations.  Please call your Halderman representative if you have questions about how to navigate this process.

Farmland Values

A CHALLENGE

Land values are softer here in the Corn Belt and we are seeing a 10-20% average decline from the peak two years ago.  The stronger areas with good crops in 2015 declined less and the historically weaker areas are struggling more.  It is important to remember that we are still in the 80th percentile of the historical price range for farmland.  If lower commodity prices persist then further declines in land values over time will occur, maybe as much as 25-30%. The debt structure in agriculture remains solid, but the lower farm incomes are the most significant factor in the land value equation.

AN OPPORTUNITY

If you are considering a farmland investment this downturn may create some better buying opportunities than in recent years.  For example farms that sold for $10,000/acre in 2014 might only bring $8,000/acre today.  In addition to a lower entry price cap rates may start to increase.  Interest rates are low for farmland purchases and there are many fixed rate opportunities.  As always the vacancy rate is basically 0% and this is a nice feature when comparing this to other alternative investments.

Why Invest in Farmland Today?  Look at the chart below.  This shows the number of people moving to the middle class in China, India and the rest of the world over the next 10-15 years.  This trend shows a positive long term future for farmland ownership as this will lead to more demand for protein.

If you want to own farmland the next 1-2 years might be an excellent time to jump into the market!!

USDA Farm Program

2014 brought a new Farm Bill from Congress.  The sign-up and implementation occurred in 2015 and so far payments went out for 2014 and projected again for the 2015 crop as prices reached low enough levels to trigger.  Maintaining the contract and delivering data timely to the Farm Service Agency remains important for landowners.  Crop insurance remains an excellent risk mitigation tool for landowners and tenants.

In conclusion, the market changed in 2014 and we are in a declining land rent and land value trend. If you are contemplating a sale during the next five years consider:

  • Farmland is in the 80th percentile of historical values and may trend lower near term due to declining incomes and rising interest rates.
  • Farm cash yields will be lower than in the past five years.
  • Interest rates are still low, but increases are predicted in the coming months. Increasing interest rates might a negative to farmland values.

It is my belief that the low commodity prices are stimulating demand across the globe and the long term fundamentals for agriculture remains bullish as production must increase to meet the rising demand for food.  For example, the US cattle herd is expanding for the first time in many years due to lower feed costs and better pasture conditions.  This correction is appropriate following the run we’ve enjoyed and in response to the decline in farm incomes.  If you have any questions related to your farmland investment please call the Halderman main office at 800-424-2324 or your local representative.

March 2016

Featured Property #6963Halifax County, VA

  • Acres: 204
  • Max Hunters: 6
  • Price: $3,300

This Halifax County property available for lease is located about 20 minutes north of South Boston. The property has approximately 40 acres of fields which flow through the center of the tract. These fields are…  read more

We’ve partnered with the NWTF to support theirSave The Habitat. Save The Hunt. initiative.

We are donating $10 from every lease to the NWTF and we’re giving you, the hunter, the opportunity to match our donation!

Thank You, Michael!
Have been with BCL for 2 yrs in KY. Looking forward to next season. Thanks Base Camp Leasing!
-Michael Reynolds via Facebook.com

BY: Bernie Barringer – OutdoorHub.com

If you are doing your homework, you are using scouting cameras and long range surveillance with binoculars to keep track of the bucks that live on the land where you hunt. You have a pretty good feel for the bucks that use the area. Then the rut comes along… read more

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Copyright © 2016
Base Camp Leasing, Inc.
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Our mailing address is:
10412 Allisonville Road, Suite 101
Fishers, IN  46038
(866) 309-1507
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February 2016

Featured Property #6655Brown County, IL

  • Acres: 1040
  • Max Hunters: 15
  • Price: $31,200

Here’s a thousand plus acre farm for lease in Brown County, Illinois, sitting right in the heart of the golden triangle. The entire eastern side is bordered by the La Moine River, which… read more

If you’re interested inNEBRASKA contact
Ed Griffin – Regional Mgr

ed@basecampleasing.comIf you’re interested in the CAROLINAS contact
Joe Brooks – Regional Mgr
joe@basecampleasing.com
Congratulations, Nolan!

This is my son Nolan”s first buck – first ever deer! I was a proud Dad to be sitting with him while he took this great Indiana buck off our Base Camp Lease.He made a perfect shot on this buck with his .44 Magnum CVA Scout, and he watched this buck run only 40 yards before piling up in the creek!

Unforgettable memories! -Scott Leisure
by Daniel Xu – OutdoorHub.com
Getting a bighorn tag is rare enough, but harvesting this old bighorn monarch was the experience of a lifetime for one avid hunter. Tony Loop already holds Arizona’s state record for bow-harvested desert bighorn, but a massive ram taken late last year may very well net him the archery world record… read more
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Copyright © 2016
Base Camp Leasing, Inc.
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Our mailing address is:
10412 Allisonville Road, Suite 101
Fishers, IN  46038
(866) 309-1507
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